Algonquins Of Barriere Lake Trilateral Agreement

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Press release of the attempt to end the 1993 trilateral agreement www.barrierelakesolidarity.org/2008/03/resources.htmlwww.facebook.com/BarriereLakeSolidaritycanadians.org/node/8527canadians.org/node/5771 In the summer of 2010, Canada imposed a chief and council election for the municipality of Barriere Lake and congratulated one chief and four councils based on 10 ballots sent for the community of 450 people. The majority of community members do not want the Indian Act Band-Council`s electoral system. Before the election was imposed, 200 parishioners from Barriere Lake signed a community resolution in support of the Mitchikanibikok Anishinabe Onakinakewin. The boss, celebrated by INAC, has since refused the position of showing solidarity. And since then, the four band councils have been in discussions with forest and mining exploration companies to open their lands to unsustainable development, including the Copper One Inc.`s Copper One Inc.`s Copper-Nickel Exploration Project, without consulting the municipality. The mineral exploration project is located in the heart of the hunting and fishing areas of several families that extend over two watersheds, the Gatineau River and the Cabonga River; The two eventually flow into the Ottawa River. The Michikanibikok Inik (Algonquins of the Barrier Lake) signed a historic trilateral agreement with Quebec and Canada in 1991 to establish an unprecedented system of sustainable development and environmental management of more than 10,000 square kilometres of their traditional unceded territory, through which they assert the rights and rights of Aboriginal people. In addition, Barriere Lake and Québec City signed an agreement to this effect in 1998 to negotiate, among other things, the joint management of the territory and the sharing of resources. Despite these agreements, the governments of Quebec and Canada have consistently refused to keep their promises and have allowed several timber companies to uproot vast tracts of land without consulting the municipality. Every year, about $100,00,000 is earned in this region through forestry, hydropower and rural tourism; the Municipality of Barriere Lake receives one cent. Once again this year, quebec`s Ministry of Natural Resources granted permits to major timber companies without meaningful consultation with the Algonquin Michikanibikok Inik (in violation of the pioneering agreements signed).